A celebration of notable women in different fields of study, from all walks of life. Each week will feature a different theme. Submissions are welcome.

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Reblogged from upallnightogetloki  6,236 notes
soulbrotherv2:

An African Princess Who Stood Unafraid Among Nazis
Her autobiography is a one-of-a-kind perspective of an educated, empowered, world-traveling daughter of a royal family, which no one wanted to publish until now.

By Jenee Desmond-Harris
Between 1939 and 1946, Fatima Massaquoi penned one of the earliest known autobiographies by an African woman. But few outside of Liberian circles were aware of it until this week, when Palgrave McMillian published The Autobiography of an African Princess, edited by two historians and the author’s daughter.
The book follows Massaquoi, born the daughter of the King of Gallinas of Southern Sierra Leone in 1904, to Liberia, Nazi Germany and the segregated American South, where she wrote her memoirs while enrolled at Tennessee’s Fisk University.
She died in 1978, and her story could have died with her.  [Continue reading complete article at The Root.]

soulbrotherv2:

An African Princess Who Stood Unafraid Among Nazis

Her autobiography is a one-of-a-kind perspective of an educated, empowered, world-traveling daughter of a royal family, which no one wanted to publish until now.

By Jenee Desmond-Harris

Between 1939 and 1946, Fatima Massaquoi penned one of the earliest known autobiographies by an African woman. But few outside of Liberian circles were aware of it until this week, when Palgrave McMillian published The Autobiography of an African Princess, edited by two historians and the author’s daughter.

The book follows Massaquoi, born the daughter of the King of Gallinas of Southern Sierra Leone in 1904, to Liberia, Nazi Germany and the segregated American South, where she wrote her memoirs while enrolled at Tennessee’s Fisk University.

She died in 1978, and her story could have died with her.  [Continue reading complete article at The Root.]

Reblogged from scienceofsarcasm  12,895 notes
pussyharvest:

jesuswithalacefront:

gadaboutgreen:

scienceyoucanlove:




How many women can you guess? Do you remember/know what each one of them did/discovered?
Once you make your guess, head over to All Science, All the Time to see if you were right:http://ow.ly/pXjrG






source

Oh wow, that’s AN AWESOME LIST OF WHITE WOMEN SCIENTISTS! But how could you forget:
Asima Chatterjee: The awesome Indian woman who help discover drugs we use to treat cancer, malaria, and epilepsy!ORChien-Shiung Wu: THE FIRST LADY OF PHYSICS?! OR WHADDABOUTEllen Ochoa: The first Latina in SPACE! AND the First Latina Director of the Johnson Space Center.Oo, and don’t forget!!Flossie Wong-Staal: The woman that successfully map HIV and pave the way to prove that HIV causes AIDS. GURL!Mae Jemison: First Black woman IN SPACE!!! And worked the first flight into space after the Challenger Accident.But don’t stop!Patricia Bath: The First Black woman doctor awarded a patent for a medical device: a laser that removes cataracts! (Fancy that!)AND THE BOSSEST!Shirley Ann Jackson: The first Black woman to earn a PhD from MIT in nuclear physics.
Hot damn! Women of Color in Science!!! 

reblogging solely for the criticisms and shade.

I’m fucking cackling

pussyharvest:

jesuswithalacefront:

gadaboutgreen:

scienceyoucanlove:

How many women can you guess? Do you remember/know what each one of them did/discovered?

Once you make your guess, head over to All Science, All the Time to see if you were right:http://ow.ly/pXjrG

Oh wow, that’s AN AWESOME LIST OF WHITE WOMEN SCIENTISTS! But how could you forget:

Asima Chatterjee: The awesome Indian woman who help discover drugs we use to treat cancer, malaria, and epilepsy!

OR

Chien-Shiung Wu: THE FIRST LADY OF PHYSICS?! 

OR WHADDABOUT

Ellen Ochoa: The first Latina in SPACE! AND the First Latina Director of the Johnson Space Center.

Oo, and don’t forget!!

Flossie Wong-Staal: The woman that successfully map HIV and pave the way to prove that HIV causes AIDS. 

GURL!

Mae Jemison: First Black woman IN SPACE!!! And worked the first flight into space after the Challenger Accident.

But don’t stop!

Patricia Bath: The First Black woman doctor awarded a patent for a medical device: a laser that removes cataracts! (Fancy that!)

AND THE BOSSEST!

Shirley Ann Jackson: The first Black woman to earn a PhD from MIT in nuclear physics.

Hot damn! Women of Color in Science!!! 

reblogging solely for the criticisms and shade.

I’m fucking cackling

Reblogged from blackhistoryalbum  5,010 notes
blackhistoryalbum:

A young “Miss Maggie” Walker, the daughter of a former slave, who in 1903 became the first woman of any race to found and become president of an American bank. She also founded a newspaper and a department store called “Saint Luke’s Emporium.”
Courtesy of the Maggie L. Walker National Historic SiteFind Black History Album on Tumblr  Pinterest  Facebook  Twitter

blackhistoryalbum:

A young “Miss Maggie” Walker, the daughter of a former slave, who in 1903 became the first woman of any race to found and become president of an American bank. She also founded a newspaper and a department store called “Saint Luke’s Emporium.”

Courtesy of the Maggie L. Walker National Historic Site

Find Black History Album on
Tumblr  Pinterest  Facebook  Twitter

Reblogged from scienceofsarcasm  825 notes

afro-dominicano:

Geophysicist Estella Atekwana

Estella Atekwana grew up in Cameroon. “My parents very much wanted me to do medicine,” she writes.

“So I got into sciences with that intention. However, I took a course in geology in high school and the teacher indicated that geology was not for girls. I was challenged then to demonstrate that girls could do geology and perform the same as boys or even better. I ended up with the science award that year in chemistry, biology, and geology.”

Image 1: Professor Estella Atekwana teaches Potential Field Methods at Oklahoma State University via Training Tomorrow’s Geoscientists

Image 2: University of Oklahoma seismologist Katie Keranen and Oklahoma State University geophysicist Estella Atekwana install a seismometer following a series of earlier quakes. (Shannon Dulin) via Fracking Spurred Biggest Earthquake Yet

She moved to North America to study the geosciences, earning a bachelor’s and master’s in geology from Howard University and a Ph.D. from Dalhousie University in Canada. “Today, they call me Doctor and that’s fine with my parents.”

She is now Sun Chair at Oklahoma State University, where she is a leader in the new field of biogeophysics [Biogeophysics is a subdiscipline of geophysics concerned with how plants, microbial activity and other organisms alter geologic materials and affect geophysical signatures.].

Reblogged from trowelblazers  114 notes

HAPPY BIRTHDAY FLORENCE BASCOM! Pioneering geologist, academic & teacher

trowelblazers:

image

Florence Bascom (1862–1945) was a true pioneer in geoscience: her PhD work furthered our understanding of the origins and formation of the Appalachian Mountains, and she geologically mapped a good portion of the United States. She was both a professional geologist, and an academic and teacher. Amongst many other firsts, Bascom was the first woman to be hired by the US Geological Service in 1896 and the first woman to present a paper at the Geological Society of Washington in 1901. She was also Associate Editor of The American Geologist journal from 1896-1905, and the first female officer of the Geological Society of America (elected as Vice President in 1930).

Her work was so respected by her colleagues that in 1906 the first edition of the not-entirely-accurately named American Men of Science rated her among the top one hundred leading geologists in the USA. The establishment clearly wasn’t ready for Florence Bascom, nor her trowelblazing legacy: later editions of Men of Science included many of Bascom’s female students, and yet it stuck with that title until 1971!

READ MORE at trowelblazers.com/florence-bascom/

Reblogged from upallnightogetloki  8,881 notes

originalplumbing:

Hirstory lesson time! When heading to all your “Pride” parties this weekend, don’t forget the people who came before us, those who paved the way, who are often overlooked especially by mainstream LGB(T) “culture”.

Marsha P Johnson was an American transgender rights activist, Queen of Stonewall and Transgender Revolutionary. She was a co-founder of Street Transvestite Action Revolutionaries (S.T.A.R.) in the early 1970s and became the “mother” of S.T.A.R. House along with Sylvia Rivera. They would get together food and clothing to help support the young trans women living in the house on the lower East Side of NYC.

Reblogged from lana-got-coned  67,779 notes

kreyolcoco:

thoughtsofablackgirl:

Girls&WomenToKnow: Leanna Archer

Meet Lenna Archer, who started her Leanna Inc. a haircare line at This Long  years old. Leanna all nautral organic hair products has generated over $ $100,000 in revenue. Leana develops and mixes each of her products (the original hair dressing was based on a family formula), and tracks orders and customer correspondence. Her parents and two brothers assist in bookkeeping, packaging, and product testing. The company sells its shampoos, conditioners, shea butter, and other products both in stores and online. 

Leanna is a philanthropist as well in 2008 she founded the Leanna Archer Education Foundation, an organization devoted to providing better opportunities for children in Haiti. Leanna’s goal is to built schools in Haiti, while providing a Safe learning environment for over 150 students.

Leanna as been featured in Forbes Magazine, Success Magazine, INC Magazine (30 under 30) and Ebony Magazine. Online web portal, AOL Black Voices, was also impressed with Leanna and positioned the Teen CEO as #5 on their list of “ Top 9 Young Lions” who are making Black History. Leanna has also been interviewed by several major media outlets, including NBC, MSNBC,ABC,FOX Business and BET.

HAITIAN EXCELLENCE! !!
Reblogged from ambrosiajones  498 notes

bisexualfandom:

[Image one: black and white photo of Frida Kahlo holding a palette and sitting in a wheelchair, with her surgeon at her side, next to her portrait Portrait with a Portrait with Dr. Fandrill.] 

[Image two: Frida Kahlo’s painting The Broken Column, showing her nude, with a harness around her body, and a sheet covering her lower body. Her spine is visible through her opened flesh, and screws puncture her skin all over her body, while a barren landscape sits behind her.]

[Image three: black and white photo of Frida Kahlo laying in bed, holding a palette and painting her body cast.]

[Image four: photo of wheelchair and easel used by Frida Kahlo in the last years of her life.]

[Image five: black and white photo of Frida Kahlo in her last public appearance, in a protest against the CIA military coup that overthrew the elected government of Guatemala. She holds a sign in one hand and gives a salute of a clenched fist while sitting in her wheelchair with a scarf wrapped around her head. A group of people surround her, along with her husband, Diego Rivera, who stands behind her with his hand on her shoulder.]

[Image six: Drawing by Kahlo, The Accident, done in 1926, portraying the bus accident she was in in 1925, at age 18. It shows Frida laying in a plaster cast on a stretcher, in front of her home, Casa Azul; the accident itself is shown above, as a trolley collides into her school bus, with several bodies laying on the ground, while her disembodied head looks over all of it as a witness. The date of her injury and the name of the drawing are written at the bottom.]

Frida Kahlo for disabilityfest!

In keeping up with Frida’s 107th birthday today, here’s taking a few short glimpses at her relationship with disability, pain, and illness through photography and her artwork. 

For the sake of length and accessibility, I’ll link to some interesting and informative writings on Frida’s life + disability [while they are, unfortunately, quite long, I hope the language is accessible enough to compensate for their length]:

Frida Kahlo: A Biography

The Disabled Body in Julie Taymor’s Frida

Fashion, Identity, Disability: The Style of Frida Kahlo

In addition, here is quite an excellent documentary on her life: The Life and Times of Frida Kahlo. The closed-captioning is not the absolute best, but it will translate it into quite a number of different languages.

Reblogged from joanwaterhouse  14,372 notes

My youngest flaunts her mind, and frightens away the suitors. By

- Louis Nicolas le Tonnerlier de Breteuil, on his daughter, the raddest person in history, Émilie du Châtelet. Emilie was a scientist in the 18th century who proved Newton’s ideas on velocity wrong. She also played a role in helping Einstein figure out E = mcwith E=mv2 (via intuitiveunderstanding)

Also, “frightens away the suitors” = BS. Emilie du Chatelet was a hustler. Fucking Voltaire was her personal man-candy. Her husband was apparently totally cool with it. The historical record did not preserve evidence for or against a threesome.

#girls don’t you go feeling like you don’t got any role models ‘cause you got role models like damn  #it just takes a little more work to find out about them is all

(via vorvayne)

When she was a 27-year-old mother of three, du Châtelet began perhaps the most passionate affair of her life—a true partnership of heart and mind. Her lover, the writer Voltaire, recounted later, “In the year 1733 I met a young lady who happened to think nearly as I did.” She and Voltaire shared deep interests: in political reform, in the fun of fast conversations, and, above all, in advancing science as much as they could.” —pbs.org

(via okayophelia)

Reblogged from jaythenerdkid  21,888 notes
themarysue:

fireandwonder:

ladieslovescience:

femmerenaissance:

Vera Rubin (b. 1928)

When Vera Cooper Rubin told her high school physics teacher that she’d been accepted to Vassar, he said, “That’s great. As long as you stay away from science, it should be okay.”
Rubin graduated Phi Beta Kappa in 1948, the only astronomy major in her class at Vassar, and went on to receive her master’s from Cornell in 1950 (after being turned away by Princeton because they did not allow women in their astronomy program) and her Ph.D. from Georgetown in 1954. Now a senior researcher at the Carnegie Institute’s Department of Terrestrial Magnetism, Rubin is credited with proving the existence of “dark matter,” or nonluminous mass, and forever altering our notions of the universe. She did so by gathering irrefutable evidence to persuade the astronomical community that galaxies spin at a faster speed than Newton’s Universal Law of Gravitation allows. As a result of this finding, astronomers conceded that the universe must be filled with more material than they can see. 
Rubin made a name for herself not only as an astronomer but also as a woman pioneer; she fought through severe criticisms of her work to eventually be elected to the National Academy of Sciences (at the time, only three women astronomers were members) and to win the highest American award in science, the National Medal of Science. Her master’s thesis, presented to a 1950 meeting of the American Astronomical Society, met with severe criticism, and her doctoral thesis was essentially ignored, though her conclusions were later validated. “Fame is fleeting,” Rubin said when she was elected to the National Academy of Sciences. “My numbers mean more to me than my name. If astronomers are still using my data years from now, that’s my greatest compliment.”


 Sources:
1. http://innovators.vassar.edu/innovator.html?id=68; http://science.vassar.edu/women/
2. http://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/45424

A+ YES. Fabulous ladies getting it DONE.
LLS

do you realize how many scifi stories she is indirectly responsible for?  She discovered the inspiration for Dust in The Golden Compass.

Another female scientist whose discoveries have been all over Cosmos without a mention of her life. 

themarysue:

fireandwonder:

ladieslovescience:

femmerenaissance:

Vera Rubin (b. 1928)


When Vera Cooper Rubin told her high school physics teacher that she’d been accepted to Vassar, he said, “That’s great. As long as you stay away from science, it should be okay.”

Rubin graduated Phi Beta Kappa in 1948, the only astronomy major in her class at Vassar, and went on to receive her master’s from Cornell in 1950 (after being turned away by Princeton because they did not allow women in their astronomy program) and her Ph.D. from Georgetown in 1954. Now a senior researcher at the Carnegie Institute’s Department of Terrestrial Magnetism, Rubin is credited with proving the existence of “dark matter,” or nonluminous mass, and forever altering our notions of the universe. She did so by gathering irrefutable evidence to persuade the astronomical community that galaxies spin at a faster speed than Newton’s Universal Law of Gravitation allows. As a result of this finding, astronomers conceded that the universe must be filled with more material than they can see. 

Rubin made a name for herself not only as an astronomer but also as a woman pioneer; she fought through severe criticisms of her work to eventually be elected to the National Academy of Sciences (at the time, only three women astronomers were members) and to win the highest American award in science, the National Medal of Science. Her master’s thesis, presented to a 1950 meeting of the American Astronomical Society, met with severe criticism, and her doctoral thesis was essentially ignored, though her conclusions were later validated. “Fame is fleeting,” Rubin said when she was elected to the National Academy of Sciences. “My numbers mean more to me than my name. If astronomers are still using my data years from now, that’s my greatest compliment.”

 Sources:

1. http://innovators.vassar.edu/innovator.html?id=68; http://science.vassar.edu/women/

2. http://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/45424

A+ YES. Fabulous ladies getting it DONE.

LLS

do you realize how many scifi stories she is indirectly responsible for?  She discovered the inspiration for Dust in The Golden Compass.

Another female scientist whose discoveries have been all over Cosmos without a mention of her life.